When You Play with Fireworks, Don’t Get Burned

This Fourth of July, Light Up the Night — the Right Way

Whether you spend Independence Day relaxing by the lake, marching in a parade or cooking up a barbeque for family and friends, odds are that watching a brilliant fireworks display is on your list of plans for this festive summer holiday. If you will be spending the holiday in a state where fireworks are legal and want to create your own display, be sure to take the appropriate precautionary measures to keep yourself and your family safe; no one wants to spend a holiday seeking medical care for a preventable burn or injury.

Keep children far away.

Young children should never be allowed to light fireworks. Ensure they are kept at a safe distance as they are watching the show. Older children and teens under the age of 18 should be always be supervised by a trusted, attentive adult when handling fireworks. Keep in mind that among states where purchasing fireworks is legal, the age at which children can buy them varies.

Reconsider sparklers.

Thinking about setting the night aglow with your family? Sparklers can reach extreme temperatures of 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit, posing a significant burn risk to users of any age. Instead, consider reaching for glow sticks, glow-in-dark paint or a fun DIY project to create safe, yet dazzling, Fourth of July memories.

Protect your eyes.

According to the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission, 14% of fireworks injuries in 2017 affected the eyes. Anyone who is lighting fireworks or standing nearby should wear protective eyewear. Pick up a pair of safety goggles to help prevent eye injuries and burns so you can continue to watch beautiful fireworks displays for years to come.

Do not relight malfunctioning fireworks.

Your first instinct when a firework doesn’t light may be to try again … don’t! Relighting a dud can cause a fire, and one missed firework is much preferable to a dangerous blaze. Instead, wait for half an hour and then douse it with water, either by hosing it down or tossing it into a full bucket.

Carefully select your location.

Avoid lighting fireworks near anything flammable. Stay clear of people, houses, trees and shrubbery. Never light fireworks inside of a car, house or garage. Always stay outdoors in a clear, spacious and well-ventilated area — fireworks are meant to illuminate the night sky.

Properly extinguish your fireworks.

Keep a hose or bucket of water nearby to properly douse fireworks before discarding them. This helps prevent fires from sparking after your display is complete and allows you to get rid of the explosives safely.

Leave it to the pros.

The safest way to watch fireworks is to go to a professional show in your area. Sit back, relax and enjoy the display with your family — without the risk of accidental burns or fires.

Here for you when accidents happen.

All WellNow facilities will be open regular hours for Independence Day. If you or a loved one experiences a non-life-threatening burn or injury caused by a fireworks fiasco, walk in to your nearest facility for quick, convenient care. We are here to help make it all better.

SOURCES:

https://www.nsc.org/home-safety/tools-resources/seasonal-safety/summer/fireworks

https://www.cpsc.gov/Safety-Education/Safety-Education-Centers/Fireworks